We talk a lot about how your focus and attention matter a lot more than just the time you spend studying and it’s time to look at how to block apps on the iPhone while studying because most of these apps thrive by demanding your attention constantly.

It’s not that they’re malicious or evil in any way, but their business model is they make more money the more time you spend on them. Which is fine, right up until the point you’re trying to actually study. Which can be hard enough without apps constantly asking for your attention.

There was a study a while ago which actually shows how hard it is to get the flow of your concentration back. If an app distracts you even for a few seconds it can actually cost you about 20 minutes in productivity before you get your focus back to where it was on the same level.

So, the ideal option is to turn your phone off entirely. But we don’t live in an ideal world and there are actually times when your phone can help you study. So we thought it was time to look at how to block apps that you don’t want, while still allowing you to use your phone for other things which might actually be helpful.

To make the most from your studying don’t focus on the time you invest. Focus on the quality of your study session over the quantity you do. This is one of the key things we focus on and we absolutely think you can get twice the results in half the time. Make sure you grab the free audiobook Unlimited Memory by a chess grandmaster which will absolutely transform your results overnight if you apply the techniques.

I have repeatedly ensured that I am on every “Do Not Call List” that I can find. Despite this, I was getting constant annoying calls. I have used several call blocking apps on my i. Phone X to determine which one that I liked the best because of its features and ease of use, and then which one was the most effective. I settled on a combination of two apps: Robo. Killer and Mr. Number/Hiya.

These are the following reasons:

A: Mr. Number/Hiya are both excellent apps. They are now both from the same developer (one being purchased from the original developer), and pretty much identical in look and function to do a manual “look-up” to determine who it is, if possible, and then if it’s a known Spam or Fraud number, or if complaints have been submitted against a telephone number that has rung on your phone. It’s excellent at determining if complaints have been submitted because of Spam, Harrassing, Fraud, etc. Based on the results, you can decide if you want to block that number. Mr. Number has a rating of 4.7 out of 5 from approximately 65K ratings. Hiya has a rating of 4.7 out of 5 from 107K ratings. Fairly impressive numbers.

block apps on iphone
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B: Robo. Killer, on the other hand, is absolutely superb at what it does. It actively assesses the Spam, Harrassing, Fraud potential of incoming phone calls in real time based on simple criteria that you quickly select during setup. You can determine if you want to just be notified or automatically block the number. It is very efficient and accurate with this real-time assessment. It’s not perfect, as nothing is ever perfect, but I have been extremely impressed with its results. On a continual 90 day running total of blocked calls, it blocks 500+ calls. That means that it is blocking around 170 calls a month to my cell phone. This equates immediately to peace of mind from the phone constantly ringing, along with extremely dramatic reduction of “cell time”, or usage time, which equates to lower monthly cell phone bill. Robo. Killer now includes SMS/Texting Spam Blocking with the app.

Robo. Killer’s most outstanding feature is that you are able to choose from a list of about 45 preset “bots” that automatically answer calls that it is blocking. They are designed to annoy the hell out of the annoying phone caller. Many of the presets are extremely clever and absolutely hilarious. You can also create your own answer bots if you chose. This app is rated 4.6 out of 5 from approximately 61K ratings. Again, fairly impressive numbers.

What impressed me the most, is that the apps integrate seamlessly with each other, updating each other with the selected blocked numbers, despite being from different developers. Finally, ease of use was important to me. Both of the apps are easy to use with minimal attention required to them. I opted for the very reasonably priced Annual Premium Subscription for both. Mr. Number/Hiya is $14.99 for the Annual Premium Subscription, and Robo. Killer is $19.99 for the Annual Premium Subscription. The best money I’ve spent on an app.

You can see more advice like this on Quora.

There are a huge range of apps on the store which exists to help you block apps. What you really want is something easy to set up and hard to break. Most of us are fairly tech savvy these days (especially with our phones since so much of our lives go through them).

The easier it is to break out of a lock the more tempted you’re going to be to do so. It doesn’t matter how productive you feel at the moment – there will com a time when your mind wants to slack off when there’s still studying to be done.

The iPhone/iPad does have an easy to set restrictions list which will prevent certain apps being opened. If you have enough willpower this can do it for you or you can get a friend to set the passcode on your behalf which means you can’t access those apps until your study session is over.

  1. Launch the Settings app on your iPhone or iPad.
  2. Tap on General.
  3. Tap on Restrictions.
  4. Tap on Enable Restrictions at the top if you don’t already have them turned on. If you do, skip down to step 6.
  5. Enter a passcode that you’ll use to enable and disable apps.
  6. Tap the switch next to each app that you’d like to turn off.

There are specific apps like Moment which can help by balancing time rather than just blocking specific apps which might suit some people better.

If this isn’t an option we’ve also looked at specific site blockers for studying which help when you want to use your browser to help revise without being tempted to access less productive sites.